LSAT Reading Comprehension Answers

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1. B.

The author’s agenda is to discuss a possible solution for deforestation. Choice A is incorrect because the passage’s focus is not to discuss a lack of solutions; the author is clearly excited about the prospect of radar monitoring. Choice C is tempting but incorrect because nowhere in the passage does it mention that there has been a recent increase in the rate of deforestation. Choice D cites a recommendation – the lessening of emissions by companies – that is not discussed in the passage. Choice E does not contain any untrue facts, but it too narrow to be the main point of the passage.

2. B.

In the fourth paragraph of the passage, the author states “Unlike photographic satellite images, radar images can be measured at night and during days of heavy cloud cover and bad weather.” This implies that photographic satellite images cannot be used efficiently at night. Choice A is incorrect because the passage implies that the photographic satellite images are actually obscured by clouds and rain, rather than impervious to it. Choice C is incorrect because the cost of the satellites is never discussed in the passage. Choices D and E are discussed in the final paragraph, but are true about radar imaging in the 90s, rather than about photographic imaging.

3. E.

Support for this answer choice can be found in the final sentence of the passage. The author is clearly excited about radar monitoring, which eliminates choices A, B, and C (“ambivalent” means to have two conflicting opinions about something.) Choice D is incorrect because “qualified” means ‘modified, limited, or restricted in some way,’ whereas the author’s support of radar monitoring is not restricted at all.

4. B.

This answer choice is supported by the line “However, the limited data of the Mapping Project was due only to the small amount of data that could be sent from the satellite.” This implies that if more data had been able to be sent, the project may have been successful. (Note that “may” is a safe word that the LSAT often uses in its correct answers. It’s very safe to say that something “may” happen, and riskier to say that something “will” happen.)

Choice A is incorrect because nothing in the passage indicates that only satellite radar monitoring was used during the project. Choice C is incorrect because nothing in the passage indicates that the project was developed in response to the Kyoto treaty. Likewise, choice D and E are both incorrect because nothing in the passage says that only conventional monitoring was used or that only Brazil and New Guinea were monitored.

5. C.

While the Kyoto treaty does address deforestation, it does not protect rainforests from deforestation. The passage tells us that it has provisions for reforestation, which can help curb deforestation. However, the passage also notes that the rate of deforestation is faster than the rate of reforestation, so the Kyoto treaty is not protecting the forests.

Choices A and E can be found in the first paragraph. Choices B and D can be found in the third paragraph.

6. A.

The author refutes the criticism by stating that “Modern satellites can send and receive 10 times more data than their predecessors of the mid 1990s.” However, if 100 times more data is needed, then the author’s argument is severely weakened. Choice B is incorrect because even if another type of technology is even more promising, this doesn’t weaken the author’s argument that radar monitoring is more feasible now than it was in the 90s. Choice C is incorrect because nothing in the passage implies that the monitoring needs to be affordable for every country. Choice D simply helps support the idea that some of the radar monitoring in the 90s was good, which does not contradict the author’s argument. Choice E is incorrect because the author’s argument was about whether the radar monitoring could be used for surveillance, not whether it could force government compliance.

7. D.

Choice A is incorrect because the final solution (radar imaging) is endorsed by the author, not dismissed. Choice B is incorrect because the author does not restrict the solution of radar monitoring based on new evidence (see the definition for “qualify” in the explanation for question 3. Choice C is incorrect because the author never evaluates the outcome of any of the solutions, nor does the choice describe the passage in the correct order. Choice E is incorrect because the author does not discuss anything that can correctly be labeled a “theory” (and even if ‘radar imaging’ could be correctly labeled as a ‘theory,’ the final portion of the answer choice – that the theory is dismissed – would still render the choice incorrect.)